Social Stories
amywithlemon:

Children’s library tree. (Taken with instagram)

amywithlemon:

Children’s library tree. (Taken with instagram)

kurapak:

TWEET, MEET, EAT & GIVE
TWESTIVAL BRUNEI – In support of the Child Development Center, proudly supported by Swensens and Kitaro Japanese Restaurant, Brunei.  Twestival (or Twitter Festival) Brunei will take place on 24 March 2011 at Swensens, The Mall, Gadong from 7.30pm to 9.30pm. This evening of social media events aims to raise funds and awareness for a good cause and is a part of the official Twestival global event via the social media platform, Twitter. Across the world on the same day, Twestivals armed with the same aim will take place. In Brunei, our good cause is the Child Development Center.  Under the Ministry of Health, a community-based rehabilitation centre known as the Child Development Centre (CDC) was formed in 1999.  The primary objective of the CDC is to provide diagnosis, assessment, treatment and support for special needs children, to help them achieve optimal health as well as social and educational development.  Referrals to the CDC are from various sources including specialist pediatrics and neonatology clinics, primary care sources, other clinical specialties, schools and by self-referrals.  Following detailed assessment and confirmation of diagnosis, these children will be referred for specific therapy programmes. Twestival Brunei aims to raise funds from the proceeds of ice cream and kid meals sales at Swensens, The Mall, Gadong from Sunday 20 March 2011 until Thursday 24 March 2011 AND a pre-Twestival dinner event at Kitaro Japanese Restaurant, Centerpoint, Gadong on Tuesday 22 March 2011, where earnings from meals sold at 2 dinner sittings: 5.30pm and 7.30pm will also benefit the fund.  Monies raised will go towards the purchase of developmental toys, teaching aids and equipments for the children who undertake therapy at the CDC. A portion of it will also be used for the CDC’s World Down Syndrome Day in April 2011.  The official launch of Twestival Brunei will happen on Thursday 24 March 2011 at Swensens, The Mall, Gadong from 7.30pm, to 9.30pm.  The evening will be packed with fun events and where anyone who would like to come along and meet other Twitter users.  Twestival Brunei is organised by local twitterers @bruneitweet, @emmagoodegg and @zulfadly.  For further information, please visit the Twestival Brunei website at http://www.brunei.twestival.com and follow @TwestivalBrunei on Twitter.

kurapak:

TWEET, MEET, EAT & GIVE

TWESTIVAL BRUNEI – In support of the Child Development Center, proudly supported by Swensens and Kitaro Japanese Restaurant, Brunei. 

Twestival (or Twitter Festival) Brunei will take place on 24 March 2011 at Swensens, The Mall, Gadong from 7.30pm to 9.30pm. This evening of social media events aims to raise funds and awareness for a good cause and is a part of the official Twestival global event via the social media platform, Twitter. Across the world on the same day, Twestivals armed with the same aim will take place. In Brunei, our good cause is the Child Development Center. 

Under the Ministry of Health, a community-based rehabilitation centre known as the Child Development Centre (CDC) was formed in 1999.  The primary objective of the CDC is to provide diagnosis, assessment, treatment and support for special needs children, to help them achieve optimal health as well as social and educational development.  Referrals to the CDC are from various sources including specialist pediatrics and neonatology clinics, primary care sources, other clinical specialties, schools and by self-referrals.  Following detailed assessment and confirmation of diagnosis, these children will be referred for specific therapy programmes.

Twestival Brunei aims to raise funds from the proceeds of ice cream and kid meals sales at Swensens, The Mall, Gadong from Sunday 20 March 2011 until Thursday 24 March 2011 AND a pre-Twestival dinner event at Kitaro Japanese Restaurant, Centerpoint, Gadong on Tuesday 22 March 2011, where earnings from meals sold at 2 dinner sittings: 5.30pm and 7.30pm will also benefit the fund. 

Monies raised will go towards the purchase of developmental toys, teaching aids and equipments for the children who undertake therapy at the CDC. A portion of it will also be used for the CDC’s World Down Syndrome Day in April 2011. 

The official launch of Twestival Brunei will happen on Thursday 24 March 2011 at Swensens, The Mall, Gadong from 7.30pm, to 9.30pm.  The evening will be packed with fun events and where anyone who would like to come along and meet other Twitter users. 

Twestival Brunei is organised by local twitterers @bruneitweet, @emmagoodegg and @zulfadly.  For further information, please visit the Twestival Brunei website at http://www.brunei.twestival.com and follow @TwestivalBrunei on Twitter.

occupystudentdebt:

Well, where do I start? I am currently about $75,000 in debt with student loans in Education, for my B.S. and my M.A. I am finally working in a public school as a Special Education Teachers ASSISTANT!! I make $10/hour (less than I made in college) and have a husband who is currently pursuing a degree while working at Lowes (because he was laid off from his construction job when the company got bought out- after 10 years of service) .  We do not make enough to even pay my loans right now! I have applied for monthly based income payments, but do not make enough money to qualify and therefore am in forbearance right now, so that I can earn more interest while waiting for my magical income to start. I graduated with my B.S. in 2003 from a prestigious educational college in MI, however the wonderful early childhood school I was working for shut-down due to the economy :( Thus, we are now living in TN starting from scratch with jobs and experience here.
I just want a job that get paid enough to make my monthly bills or help eliminate some debt. I work my tail off teaching these special needs students and I don’t even get paid for our break over the holidays….
I can’t wait til my hubby graduates and realizes the debt he occurs for this degree will hardly be worth getting the degree bc most likely there will be no jobs in his field anyway.
Here’s for the smart ones that went straight from H.S. to work, they have job security and good pay! lol :D

occupystudentdebt:

Well, where do I start? I am currently about $75,000 in debt with student loans in Education, for my B.S. and my M.A. I am finally working in a public school as a Special Education Teachers ASSISTANT!! I make $10/hour (less than I made in college) and have a husband who is currently pursuing a degree while working at Lowes (because he was laid off from his construction job when the company got bought out- after 10 years of service) .  We do not make enough to even pay my loans right now! I have applied for monthly based income payments, but do not make enough money to qualify and therefore am in forbearance right now, so that I can earn more interest while waiting for my magical income to start. I graduated with my B.S. in 2003 from a prestigious educational college in MI, however the wonderful early childhood school I was working for shut-down due to the economy :( Thus, we are now living in TN starting from scratch with jobs and experience here.

I just want a job that get paid enough to make my monthly bills or help eliminate some debt. I work my tail off teaching these special needs students and I don’t even get paid for our break over the holidays….

I can’t wait til my hubby graduates and realizes the debt he occurs for this degree will hardly be worth getting the degree bc most likely there will be no jobs in his field anyway.

Here’s for the smart ones that went straight from H.S. to work, they have job security and good pay! lol :D

tedx:

I am a huge TED fan, and when I heard that a TEDx event was in my neighborhood, I knew that I had to attend. When I say it was in my neighborhood, I mean that the conference was held in the Southeast region of the United States. You see, I live in New Orleans. The event was the TEDxPeachtree…

jtotheizzoe:

Touch: Why Are We Obsessed With Autistic Kids Having Superpowers?
Kiefer Sutherland’s new show Touch premieres this week, and the plot hinges on the “superpowers” of a non-neurotypical child Jake. Jake can predict the future, which is of course not only impossible, but dangerously stereotypical of autism spectrum disorders. Actually, “stereotypical” is the wrong word. “Bullshit” or “insulting” are closer to the word I am looking for.
I am sure there will be plenty of the terrorist ass-kicking and 1,000-yard stare neo-MacGuyverism that Kiefer Sutherland has come to be known for, but is this really how we should portray autism on television, or anywhere? From io9:

The danger here is that the autistic character could be akin to the “magical negro” or the “noble savage” in popular culture, says Steve Silberman, a frequent contributor to Wired who’s writing a book about autism to be published in 2013. Silberman explains that these are
“… characters that were significantly disabled in a social sense, but who had a kind of innocence and purity that enabled them to play their central role in the narrative: that of redeeming the hero, who wasn’t disabled and was only temporarily an outcast. Those characters usually faded offscreen when the hero attained his rightfully high status in society; they were only valuable for what they could render unto the mainstream characters — very much like the gay “best friend” in a million TV shows who coaches the female lead on her romantic problems but never has a sex life of his own (“gross!”), or the fat girl who’s “like a sister” to the geeky-but-hot male lead.”

(via io9)

jtotheizzoe:

Touch: Why Are We Obsessed With Autistic Kids Having Superpowers?

Kiefer Sutherland’s new show Touch premieres this week, and the plot hinges on the “superpowers” of a non-neurotypical child Jake. Jake can predict the future, which is of course not only impossible, but dangerously stereotypical of autism spectrum disorders. Actually, “stereotypical” is the wrong word. “Bullshit” or “insulting” are closer to the word I am looking for.

I am sure there will be plenty of the terrorist ass-kicking and 1,000-yard stare neo-MacGuyverism that Kiefer Sutherland has come to be known for, but is this really how we should portray autism on television, or anywhere? From io9:

The danger here is that the autistic character could be akin to the “magical negro” or the “noble savage” in popular culture, says Steve Silberman, a frequent contributor to Wired who’s writing a book about autism to be published in 2013. Silberman explains that these are

“… characters that were significantly disabled in a social sense, but who had a kind of innocence and purity that enabled them to play their central role in the narrative: that of redeeming the hero, who wasn’t disabled and was only temporarily an outcast. Those characters usually faded offscreen when the hero attained his rightfully high status in society; they were only valuable for what they could render unto the mainstream characters — very much like the gay “best friend” in a million TV shows who coaches the female lead on her romantic problems but never has a sex life of his own (“gross!”), or the fat girl who’s “like a sister” to the geeky-but-hot male lead.”

(via io9)

beingblog:

Asperger’s, Autism, and Parenting

by Andy Dayton, guest contributor

Here’s a four-minute animation from StoryCorps with a touching conversation between 12-year-old Joshua Littman and his mother, Sarah. Joshua has Asperger’s syndrome, which is related to autism. His mother describes it as “born without social genes.” We get a sense of Joshua’s unique perspective and perceptiveness by the questions he asks his mother, including this weighty one:

Joshua: Did I turn out to be the son you wanted when I was born? Did I meet your expectactations, and …

Sarah: You’ve exceeded my expectations, sweetie. Because — sure you have these fantasies about what your child’s gonna be like — but you have made me grow so much as a parent, because you made me think …

Joshua: Well I was the one who made you a parent.

Sarah: You were the one who made me a parent. That’s a good point. But also, because you think differently than, y’know, what they tell you in the “parenting books.” I really had to learn to think out of the box with you, and it’s made me much more creative as a parent and as a person. And I’ll always thank you for that.

It made me think of SOF’s program “Being Autistic, Being Human” — a conversation with Paul Collins and Jennifer Elder, whose son Morgan is autistic. The show forever changed my understanding of the words “autism” and “Asperger’s’” — a conception that, for me, is now more of a sliding scale and includes many talented people that, if they lived today, may have been diagnosed with Asperger’s or autism. Here’s Collins on some of what he’s learned from his son:

Krista:Yes. I mean, how does living with Morgan and the way you’ve had to think about autism — how does that change the way you think about some of these great existential questions or, you know, what it means to be human? How does it change the way you live — think about yourself?

Paul Collins: I think I’ve become — I would hope, at least, much more patient and empathetic with other people when they’re acting in ways that I don’t understand. I think that in the past when someone seemed to be acting oddly or seemed to be sort of very socially awkward or just doing things that seems kind of unnerving or didn’t make sense to me, I would think, ‘Well, what’s that guy’s problem?’ and, you know, maybe avoid them. That’s, I think, a natural reaction for anyone to have.

Krista: Yes.

Paul Collins: But at the same time, when I see that now, I actually find myself asking that as a genuine question. ‘What is that person contending with, you know? Or what is it like for that person?’


Andy DaytonAndy Dayton formerly served as associate web producer for On Being. You can follow him on Twitter or read his blog.

We welcome your reflections, essays, videos, or news items for possible publication on SOF Observed. Submit your entry through our First Person Outreach page or simply share a photo of your garden.

usepipette:

I snuck away from Rock Health last Tuesday to volunteer my time at the Hacking Autism event. The hackathon brought developers, designers, artists, and parents from all over California to build applications for children on the autism spectrum.

Before the event, HP and Goodby put out an…

beingblog:

Hitchcock’s Rope, Music for Our Autism Program

by Mitch Hanley, senior producer

Frame from Alfred Hitchcock's "Rope"

When we first produced our autism program a little over a year ago, I had just watched Alfred Hitchcock’s Rope, a fascinating movie that was shot more like a play than a movie. All of the scenes take place across two adjacent rooms and were shot with one camera, meaning all of the edits were just end-to-end, joining edits, without any cutaways to other angles, etc. So, it is as if you are watching a play without any set changes.

There is a scene in the film where Philip Morgan (Farley Granger) is playing Poulenc’s “Perpetual Motion” at the piano and Rupert Cadell (Jimmy Stewart) is asking him sensitive questions, with metronome in hand, intermittently dialing up the tempo with Morgan in lock step, playing this same piece faster and faster, the tension building.

That setting of the tune is rather anxiety-inducing, but I found the piece to be light and jaunty, with a tinge of melancholy, which reminds me of this time of year. I found James Campbell’s recording of that piece for piano and clarinet and set it into the autism program and it took on a whole other mood than was presented so cleverly by Hitchcock. You can hear the piece on the Being Playlist.

I tried to find the scene at the piano on YouTube, but I could only find the trailer in which you can faintly pick out an arrangement of the Poulenc piece for orchestra, in the background.

Hitchcock’s Rope — great movie, even if it is a bit grim. Check it out! Incidentally, if you rent the DVD, make sure you watch the additional “behind the scenes” segments; they explain the challenging shooting process (during one of the shoots, a member of the crew had his foot broken by a camera dollying across the floor!)

tedx:

Hundreds of talks from independently organized TEDx events around the world are published on the TEDxTalks website daily.

Each Tuesday and Thursday, we’ll choose four of our favorites, highlighting just a few of the enlightening talks from TEDx community, and its diverse constellation of ideas…